cooker advice

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sparkyyoda

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Hi everyone,

This is my first post so here goes:8}

I first fixed a house back in jan this year at the time the cooker circuit was agreed with customer and a 32a 6.0mm circuit was wired in. Got the call today to go connect cooker up I turn up and a nice shiney range cooker is sat there..............RATED 16 kW!! :_|

Ive sorted a new route for a bigger cable so no problem there but what about isolation standard cooker switches rated 45a. Any suggestions. Thanks in advance. J.

 

mikel

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Might have got this wrong but does diversity not apply to cookers? ?:| The cooker might be rated at 16kw but after diversity that'd come down quite a bit

 

Theorysparky

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Hi Yoda

Welcome to the forum

Firstly have you applied diversity for the cooker ???

frist 10 amps +30% of remainder = 5 amps if cooker switch has socket ?

16kw/230 = 70 Amp= 60/30=20amp= 30amp total maybe +5 amp

switch would cope

6mm would cope depending on routing

 

sparkyyoda

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Yes I looked at it with diversity but im just worried that if they were cooking a large meal and most of the range is on, the mcb will trip. So I was thinking larger cable & switch.

 

Theorysparky

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What do the electrical instructions for the cooker say ??

i bet it says 45 amp cooker switch + 6mm cable ......possibly 10mm

that is what you need to consider

 

sparkyyoda

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I only glanced over cooker instructions mainly to look at the rating. Im back there tomorrow I'll check through instructions. Thanks.

 

robertarathoon

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you will be suprised if you turn off every appliance in the house and turn up the range to full capacity, then put a clamp meter around your meter tails you will certaintly not be drawing 45A, as long as you use an adequate cable size and an mcb equal to or less than the maximum for your cable or switchgear rating you will be fine, the mcb will not trip. most houses under standard use with all your normal appliances being used are lucky to draw 10A into the property. If you need any more advice why not contact the niceic technical department. cheers rob

 
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Hello yoda

It is very unlikely that everything will be on at once and in the unlikely event they are the elements are cutting in and out as they get up to temperature. I have just installed cabling for a similar cooker. I did use 10mm and put cable through a metal conduit so no Rcd protection is required. I do not like putting cooker through Rcd's.

batty

 
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I was a believer of the old wives tale about cookers/full on/christmas/blown fuse/ect. It wasn't until i sat the 2391 and the very good lecturer explained it, that with the diversity, the time it takes for the over-current device to operate and the thermostats, the breaker/fuse will never operate due to overload.

 

steptoe

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you will be suprised if you turn off every appliance in the house and turn up the range to full capacity, then put a clamp meter around your meter tails you will certaintly not be drawing 45A, as long as you use an adequate cable size and an mcb equal to or less than the maximum for your cable or switchgear rating you will be fine, the mcb will not trip. most houses under standard use with all your normal appliances being used are lucky to draw 10A into the property. If you need any more advice why not contact the niceic technical department. cheers rob
WHY????

and they know what exactly about this cooker?

they didnt make it,

nor did they make the regs either, even if they think they did.

and boy oh boy,

dont they just hate it when you stick it up them and deviate and tell them they aint the law,,,, :^O :^O:^O:^O

fokemall I say, :p

 

kme

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Okay,..................... Here goes:

I`m going to stick my neck out here. IF the range is capable of drawing 16K (ignoring, for a mo, the fact that a standard domestic supply is 15K fused!) ; The switch MUST be capable of breaking the rated current of the circuit, AND the circuit must not be designed to have long-term overloads applied.

Therefore, if I were doing this job.................... I`d have a contactor supplying the range. Then, I could use a 5A wall switch if I wanted to. Load at the switch is minimal.

Where`s the problem?

 
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