Green Gunge

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1960's house, lady wanted extra sockets in living room and light switches changed to dimmers, nice easy job I thought especially as property rewired in 2001. Previous spark has left old cables in backboxes which are leaking that green gunge (breakdown of plasticiser?).

She wasnt impressed to say the least when I pointed this out to her but I am not sure if the old cables can remain in situ or not.

Any ideas guys cos I definately wouldnt have left them in myself if doing rewire!

Thanks

 

Mr Sworld

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Unless they can be easily removed then what can you do? You can hardly start chasing into walls/lifting floorboards to remove them.

Cut them back as much as you can and put a bit of filller in to stop the worst of it is all I can suggest.

 

sparkyrj

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This green gunge is mentioned in the nic snags and solutions book. Evidently it does no harm, and happened to some pvc cable manufactured at that time.

 

heathelect

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This green gunge is mentioned in the nic snags and solutions book. Evidently it does no harm, and happened to some pvc cable manufactured at that time.
Dont get that green sh-te in your eyes it bloody well stings, so be warned. :( :( :( :( dave

 
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Cheers guys for the replies.

The electrician who did the rewire didint replace the strapper cable for landing light and their is no cpc but is switched with brass plate switches. I have had to change to white plastic switches until customer decides if she wants me to replace the cable.

I think full PIR is needed, shame their are cowboys out their giving us bad reputation. But hey on the positive more work for me hopefully!

 

GreekIslandLover

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I think it can also be lubricant used for cable pulling that oozes. I understand that washing up liquid was commonly used, and that goes sticky over time. Might even help to break down the insulation too!

 
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The corrosion is caused by the leeching of an acidic plasticiser that was used in cable manufacture. The acidic compound mixes with atmospheric moisture and forms a mild acid resulting in corroding copper - hence the green colour. There are some health implications, as would be expexted with any chemical compound, and eventually corrosion can affect the conductors.

 

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