HELP, Holiday Units!!!!!

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paaul12

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Advice needed, from knowledgeable electricians

I was wondering if any of you out there could answer this question for me.

I have a stable yard consisting of 27 stables split into 6 individual blocks

I have obtained planning permission to convert them into holiday units

2 No 3 beds and 3 No 2 beds

I have a standard electric connection

The units will all be all eclectic with a 12kw combination boiler for heating and hot water

The question is do I need to obtain a new supply

Can I run a power supply from my existing electric connection, to each new unit

Some one told me I would need a 600amp supply and would have to contact the electric company to supply this new connection, is that correct

Thanks for your help and any advice you can give

Paul

 

baldelectrician

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You need to get someone in who is compotent enough to work out your load and inform you of the power supply requirements.

I would almost certainly say you need a new supply, one reason for this is to keep your house electric bill and your business electrical bill seperate

 

paaul12

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Thank you all for your replies I am very grateful

The supply binky as you have suggested is a typical domestic supply running the former stable yard

I am now going to create 6 individual domestic units, all being run on electric, which could potentially be operating at the same time. With no electric knowledge I would imagine that would be quite a load!

Is it nit possible to separate the cable after it leaves the meter box into 6 individual supply to go to each new unit.

Or is the problem that the supply coming to the meter would just not be big enough

Apologies if my questions are very amateurish, I am just trying to get an understanding of what is required

If it has o be a new supply laid on to the meter box I would imagine that could be quite costly

Thanks again for taking the time to reply

 

Admin1

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Welcome to the forum Paaul12.

I would say the same as the others and to get a spark in.

He/she could calculate it all and even help you to fill in the demand section of your DNO supply application forms.

:)

 
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In a commercial situation you can sometimes arrange with the supply co. to sign up for ,say a 5 year price aggrement and the installation would be free. But take care with what you sign up for, especially as they are holiday flats and thus would not be used permanently.

 
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Out of curiosity why an electric combi? It's about the most expensive method of heating (I know it's all we have). What about an oil tank? Or some of the more 'green' alternatives? There are grants avaialble.

 
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I do think the money you'd save on energy in the year would pay for the gas safety checks many times over.

All we have are night storage heaters and an electric immersion heater for hot water. I appreciate the combi more efficient at delivering heat when needed, BUT most (or even all) of that energy is going to be used at daytime rates. You can't even rely on cheap rate night electricity (like I do).

The reason all we have is electric heating is because of the capital cost of installing central heating. If we were starting afresh we'd have an oil boiler and a tank. Still might one day when I can afford it.

Fuel costs as a rule from the cheapest

natural > gas > oil > electric

Electricity will always go up with gas and oild prices as most of it it generated from fossil fuels. Gas and oil prices are linked, therefore they will (inevitably) get more expensive but likely to remain in the same ratio IMO

I'd go for gas everytime. And loads of insulation

(do like woodburners mind)

 

seajayess

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With a load like that you will defernatly need a new supply 3 phas and you want to hope that the transformer that supplies you at the moment has the capability to supply the units you intend developing. If not will mean a new transformer which will be expensive. CJS

 

paaul12

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Thanks for all your advice and help, very much appreciated,

At the moment not looking to good, gas might be an option and help to cut down on the electric load, I think?

Thanks again everyone, you have given me some good ideas

Paul

 

Mr Sworld

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Concur. It's going to be a big new supply! A combi boiler big enough to supply all the blocks with TRV's fitted to each radiator to shut them off when not needed may be a lot cheaper in the long term.

 
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Or is the problem that the supply coming to the meter would just not be big enough
Pretty much hits the nail on the head...

You might be lucky and already have provision for a second phase, but as someone else here said it would be best to get an electrician in to look. Being optomistic and assuming you have 2 phase supply, you could possibly get away with supplying six units from it IF water heating and central heating are supplied from a nother energy source such as oil fired boilers or calour gas (I understand oil is cheaper), which is exactly the set up I worked on recently in deepest Cornwall, so would assume is good. The other alternative is wind-turbines etc, but sounds like money is tight ergo non-starter for 10

 

laserdavy

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A mate of mine - a plumber has just installed an air source water heating system - basically an aircon unit in reverse, only heats the water up to 55 degrees so every so often he gives a blast with an immersion to kill off the legionella (or however you spell it). Although he has only had it in about 6 months and it is in a shop he says its quite economical, in fact he is going to install a larger system in a house which is next on the list, best thing is it runs off a 13A plug. The smaller ones use 2kw and produce 5.7kw.

Maybe worth a look at.

 

jl-heating

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air sourse is an option but very expensive and aslo needss a lot of instalation to fit due to the mass of pipes and unvented cylinder and reservoirs etc.

for a project like this why not go for solid fuel, nothing looks better than a log burner on a cold winters night.

the water could be on an immersion or you could add a boiler to the stove and dual heat the hot water.

another option not mentioned is as its only 5 flats and/ they are holiday flats why not look for a communal type heating ?

one large gas boiler and zone the flats ? so each one has full control of heating and hot water.

the boiler could be any of the fuels ie:gas/electric/oil/calor or solid fuel.

have a look at bio mass, it is the new baby on the block and maybe the 1 for you.

 
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air sourse is an option but very expensive and aslo needss a lot of instalation to fit due to the mass of pipes and unvented cylinder and reservoirs etc.for a project like this why not go for solid fuel, nothing looks better than a log burner on a cold winters night.

the water could be on an immersion or you could add a boiler to the stove and dual heat the hot water.

another option not mentioned is as its only 5 flats and/ they are holiday flats why not look for a communal type heating ?

one large gas boiler and zone the flats ? so each one has full control of heating and hot water.

the boiler could be any of the fuels ie:gas/electric/oil/calor or solid fuel.

have a look at bio mass, it is the new baby on the block and maybe the 1 for you.
Mr Swolrd #13!

:D

 
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