Home battery to grid connection

Help Support Talk Electrician Forum:

Shippo57

Member
Joined
May 13, 2022
Messages
6
Reaction score
4
Hi, I'm new to the forum, advice needed please, I have purchased 2
3.5kw Pylontech batteries, and a Solis 3.6kw hybrid inverter, I know I can connect the inverter to the battery disconnect and the disconnect to the battery, I just wondered if a standard electrician could wire the inverter to my consumer unit? or do I need a solar installer to do it. PS I got a hybrid inverter so I can add solar panels as well. Thanks in advance...
 
Joined
May 7, 2008
Messages
11,414
Reaction score
425
Location
Sunny Plymouth
Hi, I'm new to the forum, advice needed please, I have purchased 2
3.5kw Pylontech batteries, and a Solis 3.6kw hybrid inverter, I know I can connect the inverter to the battery disconnect and the disconnect to the battery, I just wondered if a standard electrician could wire the inverter to my consumer unit? or do I need a solar installer to do it. PS I got a hybrid inverter so I can add solar panels as well. Thanks in advance...
Any decent electrician should be able to sort that out for you.
 
Joined
May 7, 2008
Messages
11,414
Reaction score
425
Location
Sunny Plymouth
What's the point in having an inverter, a battery, and no solar panels,?
It makes absolutely no sense, how are you going to charge the batteries,?
You can get tariffs like the old E7, so you can charge batteries on cheap off peak leccy. You can also, with a smart meter, get a half hour variable tariff. Your energy provider has some level of control of your battery, so again charges up on a cheap rate and releases leccy at peak demands, for which you get paid.
 

Shippo57

Member
Joined
May 13, 2022
Messages
6
Reaction score
4
What's the point in having an inverter, a battery, and no solar panels,?
It makes absolutely no sense, how are you going to charge the batteries,?
Thanks for your input, I use 5000kw of electricity per year at the ridiculous price of 33p pkwh. Which is £1650.00 per year. I will charge the batteries off peak at 7.5p per kwh which is £375 per year. A saving of £1275. Total cost so far £3400. I have 2 more 3.5 kw batteries on pre order so a total spend of £5600. Pay back period just under 4 and a half years, makes absolute sense to me....
 

Shippo57

Member
Joined
May 13, 2022
Messages
6
Reaction score
4
You can get tariffs like the old E7, so you can charge batteries on cheap off peak leccy. You can also, with a smart meter, get a half hour variable tariff. Your energy provider has some level of control of your battery, so again charges up on a cheap rate and releases leccy at peak demands, for which you get paid.
Hi Binky, thanks for your supportive comments. Obviously I did my sums b4 hand, I do intend to get solar, but as we plan to move house in a couple of years, batteries are fine for now...
 

BorisJ

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 27, 2020
Messages
96
Reaction score
13
Location
South East
Thanks for your input, I use 5000kw of electricity per year at the ridiculous price of 33p pkwh. Which is £1650.00 per year. I will charge the batteries off peak at 7.5p per kwh which is £375 per year. A saving of £1275. Total cost so far £3400. I have 2 more 3.5 kw batteries on pre order so a total spend of £5600. Pay back period just under 4 and a half years, makes absolute sense to me....
You won’t get as much out of the batteries as you put in. I think the in/out ratio is something like 70%. What will happen to the surplus battery power? Selling it back to the grid is a non starter at around 5p per kWh. At some time both batteries and inverter will need replacing. You need to rethink your payback time.
 
Joined
May 7, 2008
Messages
11,414
Reaction score
425
Location
Sunny Plymouth
You won’t get as much out of the batteries as you put in. I think the in/out ratio is something like 70%. What will happen to the surplus battery power? Selling it back to the grid is a non starter at around 5p per kWh. At some time both batteries and inverter will need replacing. You need to rethink your payback time.
You don't have to sell back to the grid. You can set it up to charge on off peak and release energy during the day.
 

glenns

New member
Joined
Apr 11, 2022
Messages
3
Reaction score
2
Thanks for your input, I use 5000kw of electricity per year at the ridiculous price of 33p pkwh. Which is £1650.00 per year. I will charge the batteries off peak at 7.5p per kwh which is £375 per year. A saving of £1275. Total cost so far £3400. I have 2 more 3.5 kw batteries on pre order so a total spend of £5600. Pay back period just under 4 and a half years, makes absolute sense to me....
I for one think it's a great idea... but then I'm planning the same, just waiting for all the parts to arrive. DNO have agreed and smart meter going in on the 25th 🤞
 
Top