how to approach electrical contractors regarding employment.

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andson

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hello all, After doing jobs for friends and family over the years..... i decided to sit my 17th edition and my eal modules to give them reasurance that i knew what i was doing.. i had no problems with my ability and quality of work.. anway getting slightly side tracked, i will get back to my question.. i passed all my exams and was wondering about contacting my local electrical companies to see if they had any vacancies, would i class myself as an improver or electrician and how would i go about wording a letter to these companies, being polite but getting my point accross. any examples would be greatly appriciated.

cheers andy..

 

kme

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Evenin` all.

Andson. I have had a letter requesting employment from a 20 yr old; who wanted to be an apprentice. Apart from the fact that we`re a fairly new / small company; and don`t want to take anyone on for 12 months or so; the other problem was this:

The note was on a short "torn-off" section of A4. It wasn`t badly written, per se; but there were grammatical & spelling mistakes. The lad concerned included a "C.V"; which contained similar faux pas. I appreciate that, as a youngster, he`s not going to have the same level of vocabulary & quality of letter writing as, say , you or I. However, word processors contain spelling & grammar checkers these days.If you are not good with these subjects, I strongly suggest you use them.

I would provide a letter, in the formal layout, requesting information regarding their company; with a view to being employed by them as and when an opportunity arose. Include in that letter your previous & current occupation (if any), and all qualifications held. I am not the best person on here to tell you what classification you have with certain exams. I`m sure there are others who can advise that with more knowledge than I. Include a CV by all means; but ensure it is correct grammatically, with no mistakes. Check it, and the letter. (If you wish, send a copy to me, and I`ll read it as though I were a prospective employer, and tell you my thoughts.)

Usually, the covering letter would be generic; however, if you wish, you can tailor the letter to the individual companies you wish to target. Show them that you know what their company does, and that it would be viable for them to employ you. Don`t ask for the job outright, if you can possibly avoid it. Ask for an interview instead. An interview isn`t binding. Admitted, it can cost you time, but the company concerned is more likely to see you as a dedicated, interested person,.

Hope that helps mate. If you want more info, just ask........

KME

 

Admin1

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Personally - I hate typed letters. I prefer the good old fashioned "Hand Written, well presented" version.

Spelling isn't too much of problem (In moderation).

I don't believe in all this C.V carp.

All I am interested in is if I can trust them, references, are they reliable, can they be left on their own, high quality workmanship, willing to learn etc.

 

kme

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Personally - I hate typed letters. I prefer the good old fashioned "Hand Written, well presented" version.Spelling isn't too much of problem (In moderation).

I don't believe in all this C.V carp.

All I am interested in is if I can trust them, references, are they reliable, can they be left on their own, high quality workmanship, willing to learn etc.
In an ideal world; I`d agree; however:

My brother`s stepson (18), had an application form for a job. He had to have help to fill in the "address" section FFS.

I knew my address when I was 4.

My point is that today`s children, as a general rule, know more than most of us about computers (specifically games), and apparently very little else! I mean no disrespect to anyone, or their children. I am simply speaking of this one boy. Maybe he`s thicker than average? I don`t know.

The overall point is that, is your handwriting isn`t very good (mine isn`t), a prospective employer is more likely to chuck it away, because he can`t read it easily! As an extra point; as previously noted, spelling & grammar can be checked for you. I don`t know that many youngsters; including some posters on here, who have a good idea of spelling or vocabulary.

(Neither have some of the older ones; but I`m not getting into that:^O:^ O)

 

Admin1

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Well the writing will depend on if you are right handed or left, Believe it or not.

Left handers are known to be messy (If that is athe correct word to use?) writters.

My Dad was left handed. His writing was well readable but, as mentioned above - left handers are not the neatest of writers.

:|

 

Admin1

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Do you know what the Donkies in Porthcawl, get for lunch, KME? they really spoil them and look after them well there.

 

kme

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?????"Donkies"??????? Do you mean "Donkeys"? :^O :^O

I`m probably going to regret asking, but no, I don`t know what the "donkeys" get for dinner in porthcawl. But I`m sure you`re going to enlighten us............... ?:| :x ? :| :x :eek:

 

SPECIAL LOCATION

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Do you know what the Donkies in Porthcawl, get for lunch, KME? they really spoil them and look after them well there.
Fattening them up for Christmas they are... :|

I've erd... Turkey is going to be in short supply... :eek:

Bit like...

Oil & Copper!!

Watch this space;) ;) ; ) ;)

 
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