kitchen circuits

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Apache

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I think it's thought best to put them on a seperate ring (or radial)

But I'm not a spark. Someone will be along to correct me soon......

 

Admin1

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It's best to put the kitchen on it's own ring and put a radial upstairs and down. (If you don't want to put the others on rings too).

 
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there is no hard fast rule for this, besides the 100sqm maximum area, common sense prevails

every job is different but i have looked at some installations and thought to hell with that i'l put my own ring in kitchen

did a job last week, two bed flat for a disabled woman living alone, one ringmain, four new socket outlets in kitchen, no oven circuit, no shower, only five other single sockets in flat, demand was never going to be a problem.

if it was practical i would keep a high demand area such as a kitchen on its own circuit but that is just my personal choice.

 

cheggers

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Concur with betty on this.

even on a 3 bed house the demand on the other rooms is minimal, I usually put the kitchen on one ring and the rest of the house on another

 

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is it a requirement in the 17th that on all new installations a separate kitchen ring circuit is required? or can the sockets be put on say the downstairs ring [email protected]
No.

as Cheggers & Betty say.. more a good practice sort of thing..

As long as fuse rating/cable size/volt drop/max Zs etc.. all met?

BUT

there is a recommendation with ANY ring circuit to consider the balancing of the load around the ring..

e.g. If just one d/s ring... inc kitchen & rest of downstairs it is quite possible that 90%+ of all the work will be done on a small area/length of the cable section of the ring?

The Biggest point I consider is convenience in the event of a fault..

e.g. kitchen cct goes AWOL..

customer could most likely run an extn lead from other D/S sockets to provide some power to essential bits until faults fixed! ;)

 

sparky999

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Yeah as most of you say seperate the kitchen ring from the rest of the house if it makes sense, but if only a small area to cover keep it on one.

Comes down to common sense at the end of the day doesnt it ?

 
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All depends on what is being used and size of house . I tend to put Kitchen on one ring, Utility if there is one on another ring and possibly two other rings for up and down sockets. Probably overkill but with new houses and all the insulation cables should never get overloaded.

Batty

 
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Utility- usually has Washing Machine and Tumble Drier 25 amps

Kitchen- Dishwasher, Kettle, Microwave 30 amps

Could all be used at one time maybe not likely but i don't want to be called back to jobs.

Batty

 
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Dishwasher 12.5 amps Kettle could be 12.5 amps 5 amps for microwave as i said unlikely to be used at once but could be plus you also have other items in kitchen anyway. It is the way i do jobs maybe over cautious but an electrical installation has got to last at least 25 to 30 years and with all this insulation on new builds time will tell how cables will stand up and you do not want your installation to fail.

Batty

 

TTbangbang

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I'm currently designing a kitchen ring circuit where the toaster, dishwasher and electric hob are all each 3kW. The total load, taking into account possible Christmas day use (wouldn't want it to break then!) comes to 10.7kW (46.5A). This means wiring in 4mmsq. and using a 50A RCBO. Are these values becoming typical for modern day kitchens or am I talking rubbish? Blushing

Thanks for any opinions :D

 

Apache

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I'm not coming round for christmas if you're having toast!

Don't we have to apply 'diversity' factors and not assume you're using everything?

(or have you done that?)

 

The Godfather

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I'm currently designing a kitchen ring circuit where the toaster, dishwasher and electric hob are all each 3kW. The total load, taking into account possible Christmas day use (wouldn't want it to break then!) comes to 10.7kW (46.5A). This means wiring in 4mmsq. and using a 50A RCBO. Are these values becoming typical for modern day kitchens or am I talking rubbish? BlushingThanks for any opinions :D
I wonder how many Kitchens, this may apply to.

2.5mm T&E & 32A MCB

(Diversity)

Don

 

steptoe

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I'm currently designing a kitchen ring circuit where the toaster, dishwasher and electric hob are all each 3kW. The total load, taking into account possible Christmas day use (wouldn't want it to break then!) comes to 10.7kW (46.5A). This means wiring in 4mmsq. and using a 50A RCBO. Are these values becoming typical for modern day kitchens or am I talking rubbish? BlushingThanks for any opinions :D
shouldnt your hob be on a dedicated cooker circuit?

wouldnt you be better doing the modern thing and throwing in a couple of radials,?

at least for that 3Kw toaster of yours, jez thats a big un.

Im going round apaches for xmas tho, hes not having toast either!

who the * has toast for xmas????? :^O :^O:^O

I usually do wash machine, fridge and dishwasher on seperate radials at least.

will cut down a lot of load,

 

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I'm currently designing a kitchen ring circuit where the toaster, dishwasher and electric hob are all each 3kW. The total load, taking into account possible Christmas day use (wouldn't want it to break then!) comes to 10.7kW (46.5A). This means wiring in 4mmsq. and using a 50A RCBO. Are these values becoming typical for modern day kitchens or am I talking rubbish? BlushingThanks for any opinions :D
Not quite rubbish..

BUT..

we don't have toast for Christmas lunch..

and the dishwasher don't go on till well after the the cooker finished!

and the cooker rings, when cooking are more often on a lower power keeping something simmering NOT full wack bringing stuff to the boil!

:D

Or as the Don says

DIVERSITY is the word here! ;) :)

 

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