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biker mike

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Great all i need to do now is learn to read ........ theres always a catch

 
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Blimey Slips - someone else who learned with the 14th! I thought I was the only old git on here;)

 
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Untill 4 years ago i hadn't opened my yellow regs book for years. Its because its written in legal terms with not much electrical use. See if you can have a look at the old 14th edition. It tells you in black and white what you can and can't ( or is that should and shoudn't ) do.

 

the doctor

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hi

the weird thing about the bathrooms it says in the text

you have to fit rcds on all circuits-ok i accept that

further down it then says you must bond all metalwork to all circuits just like before, then it says you dont have to bond the circuits to the pipes if you have an rcd fitted on circuits? :|

 
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Evening Doc.

Funnily enough I was reading that. Well, scanning through it, the other day.

It caught my eye too. It said if all times etc were met, the supp bonding can be omitted.

Or words to that effect.

 

the doctor

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ah ww

the extraneous metal work must be connected to the main earth trminal only, not the circuits- the bond is not required if you can prove continuity between the various metal parts...

 

Mark2spark

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...have come to the conclusion that the biggest change in 17th is that its gone back to being written in easy to understand terms...
Think I must have the Cymru version then :^O

 

Nicky Tesla

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In the Hager 17th edition DB guide, it shows a double socket with a cable going up a wall under the plaster, saying with a big tick, that this requires an rcd. Then it shows a socket with the cable going up the wall in metal conduit under the plaster, saying with a big cross that this now does not need rcd protection, but it is a socket and it is now a requirement that all, sockets require rcd protection, isn't it. Correct me if im wrong.

 

Mr Sworld

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In the Hager 17th edition DB guide, it shows a double socket with a cable going up a wall under the plaster, saying with a big tick, that this requires an rcd. Then it shows a socket with the cable going up the wall in metal conduit under the plaster, saying with a big cross that this now does not need rcd protection, but it is a socket and it is now a requirement that all, sockets require rcd protection, isn't it. Correct me if im wrong.
If the cable is less than 50mm deep it can be run in earthed metal conduit (or trunking!) and not require an rcd.

The rcd is there to prevent shock when the householder puts a nail into the wall above a lightswitch etc! The earthed metal prevents this as it instantly disconnects the circuit due to the mcb picking up the live/earth short circuit.

 

Mr Sworld

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Yes, agreed m8. BUT, aren`t all socket outlets now to be rcd protected??
Yes, it would be weird to run all circuits in conduit in a house and you can't use it on one socket on a ring.

However is does come in handy if you are running a radial for one appliance (boiler, freezer etc), then you don't need an rcd/rcbo on the circuit (no nuisance rcd trips).

And you can take it off the rcd sides of split boards so other fault don't affect it.

Could be worth the cost of a short piece of 20mm conduit, couplers and bushes compaired to the cost of an rcbo?

 

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