Regulations Relating To Position Of Socket/Fused Spur For Gas Cooker

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pejayuk

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Hi,

I've just joined the Forum and would be very grateful for any advice on the following.

I'm having a new gas cooker delivered next week and have paid a fair amount on top for the installation.

My existing cooker just has a 3 pin plug attached to the flex. It goes to a single switched socket directly behind the cooker, at a height of about 400mm from skirting board. I'm happy with this arrangement, but I've since noticed in the product description, that it must be hardwired to a fused connection unit. Is there a reason/advantage to this? Many of the other cookers (Including some from the same manufacturer) say they have a 3 pin plug attached and just need a 13A socket.

My main concern though is, I have read stuff saying the socket or FCU cannot be at the back of the cooker. And, that it has to be easily accessible so it can be isolated.

I've tried phoning the store for clarification, but they didn't seem very sure either.

I still probably have time to find someone to swap the socket for a FCU. If it does have to be moved though, that might be a problem, as there isn't anywhere suitable (except perhaps the adjacent cupboard, but that is very narrow and has the main water stopcock in).

I was just wondering if there is anything in the regulations that could help me decide what I need to do? Perhaps I am worrying too much. On the other hand, when the installers turn up, if they can't fit it because I don't have the correct outlet, or if it's in the wrong place, I'll probably lose my installation fee as they'll say it's my fault. Equally, I don't want the hassle and expense of having things altered if it isn't necessary.

Many thanks in advance to anyone who read this.

 

Andy™

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most gas cookers / come with a plug and are good to plug in. its only for ignition. if its anything electric (oven, grill) then often they do need hard wired on a cooker supply as they use more power that what a plug can handle...

 

pejayuk

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Thanks for the replies. Yeah, it is a bit vague what the installers will actually do themselves on the day and what they expect me to have had done prior. If they start coming out with excuses like 'the outlet can't be at the back of cooker', I just wanted to know if the regulations stated this and if not, I can argue my corner.

There are no electric heating elements involved here, it's just power for the oven and grill lights and the ignitor.

 

Andy™

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nothing in BS7671 says you cant have a socket behind the cooker for it to plug into

the only possible issue with a plug & socket is sometimes the cooker may not push back far enough because of the plug but thats about the worst of it

 

pejayuk

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Cheers Andy, that is exactly the info I needed. There's enough space behind the old cooker for the socket and plug and the new one is slightly smaller.

 

BorisJ

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Manufacturers instructions are guidance only and don't have to be followed if they are wrong. Other countries don't have FCUs and no doubt Hotpoint sell to other countries.

Make sure you have a plug with 3 or 5 amp fuse available as the installers probably won't have one.

 

Speed

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Hi,

I've just joined the Forum and would be very grateful for any advice on the following.

I'm having a new gas cooker delivered next week and have paid a fair amount on top for the installation.

My existing cooker just has a 3 pin plug attached to the flex. It goes to a single switched socket directly behind the cooker, at a height of about 400mm from skirting board. I'm happy with this arrangement, but I've since noticed in the product description, that it must be hardwired to a fused connection unit. Is there a reason/advantage to this? Many of the other cookers (Including some from the same manufacturer) say they have a 3 pin plug attached and just need a 13A socket.

My main concern though is, I have read stuff saying the socket or FCU cannot be at the back of the cooker. And, that it has to be easily accessible so it can be isolated.

I've tried phoning the store for clarification, but they didn't seem very sure either.

I still probably have time to find someone to swap the socket for a FCU. If it does have to be moved though, that might be a problem, as there isn't anywhere suitable (except perhaps the adjacent cupboard, but that is very narrow and has the main water stopcock in).

I was just wondering if there is anything in the regulations that could help me decide what I need to do? Perhaps I am worrying too much. On the other hand, when the installers turn up, if they can't fit it because I don't have the correct outlet, or if it's in the wrong place, I'll probably lose my installation fee as they'll say it's my fault. Equally, I don't want the hassle and expense of having things altered if it isn't necessary.

Many thanks in advance to anyone who read this.
It all depends on the amount of current the cooker requires. If it just for the ignitor, then a socket outlet is find. However, if it for an electric oven or something that requires a high current. A spur unit is best. As a socket outlet will tend to overheat the sockets pins causing a bad connection over time. And since the plug will not be removed on a regular bases (i.e. because behind cooker). You are very unlikely to notice the overheating before it causes a fire in the future. It best to go with the manufactures recommend.
 

Andy™

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original thread november stating cooker arriving in a week. OP last visited 4th dec. probably about the time the cooker arrive to check what was said here. so posting that was pretty much useless...
 

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