Tap & Die set for 20, 25mm + Steel Conduit...

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Mr Sworld

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We've got a set by 'Arc T&D', an English company, but buggered if I can find any reference to them on Google!

They are very good as they are designed for conduit and conduit only. They even come with a interchangeable collar for 20mm and 25mm to help keep them in the right place when you're starting the thread and the dies last forever!

Those ones you've linked to look like they are for forming screw holes and making new screws from blank stock or repairing old screws. And to be truthfull they look like they will break pretty quickly! :(

I'll keep trying to find a reference to them.

 

Mr Sworld

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Try here


Code:
http://www.gjhall.co.uk/eng/threading_tools.html
They have an electricians tools section in the e-book bit at the bottom, page 47 I believe.

 

Mr Sworld

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It's something to keep me occupied while I wait for hoists to come out of the ceiling!

 

Mr Sworld

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Double handed are best for new work when you've got it in your pipe bender, it's suprisingly hard work to thread conduit! The ratchet type are great if you can't remove the conduit from its position but are quite pricey!

Get a couple of cans of spray on cutting compound as well and remember a turn back for each two turns forward to help clear the swarf away.

 
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Yes thanks mate, I know that. :)

I meant, with respect, which one of them on the eBook, should I go for?

the set on the top right, is that worth it? Is it 20mm and 25mm? and do you recommend it mate?

:)

No prices on there that i can see. :(

 

Mr Sworld

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Yes thanks mate, I know that. :) I meant, with respect, which one of them on the eBook, should I go for?

the set on the top right, is that worth it? Is it 20mm and 25mm? and do you recommend it mate?

:)

No prices on there that i can see. :(
Sorry, didn't mean to teach you how to suck eggs! :eek:

They do look very similar to the type I use, prehaps they took over from Arc T&D? The DHB/MET/4 will probably do for the majority of work on conduit you'll encounter.

There is a direct sales number on the site at the bottom of the page but I don't know what the going price is.

Anyway time for me to go home and sink one or two cool beverages as the motors are now packed away in their flightcases. Chap to you soon Mr Wiz. :D

 
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Thanks for finding that Mate.

I have E-mailed sales to ask for a few prices.

What I normally find is that wesites/shops that don't advertise prices are expensive.

I do want quality tools as opposed to cheap tat, afterall, this is going to be my trade.

:)

What the saying is "If you have to ask for the price - You can't afford the item".

That's what I used to tell my passengers, when i used to take them through Paris's - Upmarket, where all the top designer shops are.

Good Night Mate,

And Thanks again.

:)

 

Mr Sworld

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Actually just seen that TLC do a 20/25mm stock and die set for

 
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These, http://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Main_Index/Conduit_Steel_Index/Conduit_Fittings_Tools/index.html

Are the same things. This is all i ever see nowadays. I do have a couple of sets of older types with square dies ( of course they have round holes in the middle)but i cant get new dies anymore. Mr Sworld is correct that you must use electricians stocks & dies, not engineers. In case you might not know, the first job to do once you have your stocks and dies is to cut 2 pieces of 20mm steel conduit , about 300mm long. Hammer one end slightly flat and knock over the stocks handles. This extra length reduces the effort needed to thread by 75%

 

cheggers

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Welsh If you are on the books ask your employer to supply.

Another good tip is, if you are doing alot of conduit use a cone cutter in a battery drill to deburr the ends

 

Mick

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I have always used the handle from my footprints to debur.
Me too , I was always told to use a round file by the sparks I learned the trade from , but they always used the grips , so I did too .

 
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