Average wage in maintenance??

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itsonlyajob

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  • i wont sugar coat it, yes you will see a massive drop in income, especially if you work for big FM firms like CBRE or Mitie and it will hurt your pride
  • start of doing ELECTRICAL maintenance only within office buildings if you can survive year 1, your views will change and your path will be much clearer
  • £38k is good if working m-f, 8am-5pm
  • if working shift/continental hours factor how much extra you would earn if you booked overtime, you expect £44k , add OT/extra shifts you can easily reach 40% tax band
  • if maintenance does not work out, you can always return to installation work
  • good luck
 

Tony Soprano

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  • i wont sugar coat it, yes you will see a massive drop in income, especially if you work for big FM firms like CBRE or Mitie and it will hurt your pride
  • start of doing ELECTRICAL maintenance only within office buildings if you can survive year 1, your views will change and your path will be much clearer
  • £38k is good if working m-f, 8am-5pm
  • if working shift/continental hours factor how much extra you would earn if you booked overtime, you expect £44k , add OT/extra shifts you can easily reach 40% tax band
  • if maintenance does not work out, you can always return to installation work
  • good luck
I won’t get anything over 38,000 until I know what I’m doing. I won’t know anything about the machines etc. facilities maintenance is not for me. I already know that one 100%. It would not challenge me. I don’t want to be in mobile maintenance where I’m here there and everywhere all the time. The production maintenance it will be, working on machines and production etc, or nothing. I’m not thinking about installation as a life long thing because I know my body won’t allow it up to retirement age. So that’s why I want to move over. I’m thinking of my long term goals. Installation is not sustainable into older years
 
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Sharpend

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I will tell you this much from experience, moving to a less physical/intense job will do you health no good. Your body is an amazing thing and will do what you want it too, it is your thinking that stops you. Since I haven’t been so heavily involved with install work, I have felt more tired for doing less physical duties. I actually find that if I do get involved in install work for a week or two then I actually feel healthier and fitter! Of course this all depends on what you classify as old?
 

Tony Soprano

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I will tell you this much from experience, moving to a less physical/intense job will do you health no good. Your body is an amazing thing and will do what you want it too, it is your thinking that stops you. Since I haven’t been so heavily involved with install work, I have felt more tired for doing less physical duties. I actually find that if I do get involved in install work for a week or two then I actually feel healthier and fitter! Of course this all depends on what you classify as old?
I’m talking 50 plus when I say old. I’m not sure I could go on site and graft, keep up with the other lads after 50. If you know what I mean. I might be wrong. Who knows. I know what your saying thow. If I sit at home for a month I feel horrendous the first week back but then I feel good again.
 
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Tulip Spark

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I did it years ago. £42k. With the shifts I get plenty of time off and still do SE work to keep my NAPIT membership. Earn about £12k extra doing this. Paid holidays, pension and sick pay. Best thing I did really. Perk is, I only take on SE work that is easy.
 

Sharpend

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I did it years ago. £42k. With the shifts I get plenty of time off and still do SE work to keep my NAPIT membership. Earn about £12k extra doing this. Paid holidays, pension and sick pay. Best thing I did really. Perk is, I only take on SE work that is easy.
This is an ideal situation for you, the question is when you do your S/E work are you charging the market rate? If you are then that’s honourable, if you’re not then that’s driving the price down for the full time S/E spark.
 

Tony Soprano

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I did it years ago. £42k. With the shifts I get plenty of time off and still do SE work to keep my NAPIT membership. Earn about £12k extra doing this. Paid holidays, pension and sick pay. Best thing I did really. Perk is, I only take on SE work that is easy.
I’m applying for jobs but hearing nothing back. The thing is they all ask for qualifications I haven’t got. I hear that certain places have site sparks and train them up but I assume that they won’t want to pay me more than around £32,000 to do that ? If I’ve got to shadow another engineer to learn it all. And I need to be on more than that. I’m not sure what to do to be honest. Maybe it’s time to stick to what I know and good at? I think it’s the lifestyle of maintenance that appeals more than anything. Steady money and same place every day. I would love to learn the job. But I’m not prepared to drop down a huge amount of money to do it.
 

Tony Soprano

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I’m still unsure how I feel. I’ve been a Subby 18 months or so. Had most of my work from a good friend who has his own company. It’s gone quiet at the minute so it isn’t sitting well with me. I’m just messaging companies currently trying to get something else. Part of me still wants to keep at subbying but I really don’t feel comfortable with the ringing around looking for work part. My contact list is low
I’m not going to make £1000 a week every week so I’d say it’s more likely to be £45,000
 

Richard-the-ninth

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But I’m not prepared to drop down a huge amount of money to do it.

I guess that answers your question then.

Look at it from the potential employers side. You have a small team of guys that do what is required, Old Bob is retiring soon, he is on £50k, there is no logic in offering £50k to a "newbie" offer £25k-30k for an experienced person, you get to save money by paying less, you are in no rush, the other guys will have to suck it up until you find the right person.
 

Sharpend

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But £45k S/E is equal to a lower employed salary, because you don’t have the expenses that a S/E has, running vehicle, insurances, large tool purchases, memberships etc. if you look at your accounts net profit figure this is closer to the employed wage you need as this is the disposable income after all your expenses.?
 

Tony Soprano

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But £45k S/E is equal to a lower employed salary, because you don’t have the expenses that a S/E has, running vehicle, insurances, large tool purchases, memberships etc. if you look at your accounts net profit figure this is closer to the employed wage you need as this is the disposable income after all your expenses.?
The last year that I worked cards in direct, I earned 40,000. And I didn’t have to take anything out of that. No fuel, no tools, no van insurance etc etc. I didn’t pay for ipaf, pasma etc. so if I’m only earning 45,000 self employed, the question I ask, is it worth it? Granted I was out the house for 11 or 12 hours a day when on the books sometimes. There’s pros and cons to both I suppose. But also I’m spending my own time looking for work.
 
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Sharpend

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So why did you make the jump to S/E at the time? Grass greener and all that?

I think most maint jobs are 12 hours shifts certainly seems that way where I am, but then they are 4on 4off and usually days and nights. Of course you could go into a hospital environment where they seem to work as little as possible but get paid little as well, I believe we have a member who does this? I always wonder what the perks side of hospital work is as wages always seem very low?
S/E is flexible if you can make it pay, unfortunately we are fighting more and more competition these days so prices are being driven down.

It’s all about striking a balance between work and life, it’s no good working all hours each week and having no quality home life. If your partner can work and contribute to the household income then your options open up more as you are not committed to earning big bucks for the family.

Ultimately it’s something that only you and your family can decide, for what works for one doesn’t work for all.
 

Tony Soprano

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So why did you make the jump to S/E at the time? Grass greener and all that?

I think most maint jobs are 12 hours shifts certainly seems that way where I am, but then they are 4on 4off and usually days and nights. Of course you could go into a hospital environment where they seem to work as little as possible but get paid little as well, I believe we have a member who does this? I always wonder what the perks side of hospital work is as wages always seem very low?
S/E is flexible if you can make it pay, unfortunately we are fighting more and more competition these days so prices are being driven down.

It’s all about striking a balance between work and life, it’s no good working all hours each week and having no quality home life. If your partner can work and contribute to the household income then your options open up more as you are not committed to earning big bucks for the family.

Ultimately it’s something that only you and your family can decide, for what works for one doesn’t work for all.
I didn’t want to work away. Too much going on at home. And basically refused. Looking back on it I didn’t handle it the best but we live and learn. Had a disagreement with the boss on a job. Was away in Leeds and was due to finish a job. Didn’t get home until 1am on the Tuesday and he wanted me in again for 7am. I refused. Next thing I know I’m being called in and contract is terminated.
 
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Tony Soprano

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Sadly this is not uncommon on the working away from home fraternity, I am more fortunate that I say when and what times I will be available!!
That company just wasn’t the right fit. I’m sure there is better ones. I think a better way to approach it would have been to say I’ll do the odd month here and there. Or I’ll do it as a favour. But I’m not going back to doing it all year round like I did before. I think if your gona be on the books you gota just show your worth to them and then you have more clout with them to say no.
 

Sharpend

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If you are on the books you will find that you have very little say in what you can and can’t do.
The art of being S/E is networking, whether that be locally or whilst working away, the more people you talk too the more you will get remembered. It also gives you more people to call upon.
 

Tony Soprano

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If you are on the books you will find that you have very little say in what you can and can’t do.
The art of being S/E is networking, whether that be locally or whilst working away, the more people you talk too the more you will get remembered. It also gives you more people to call upon.
I’m not ready to give up on self employed yet but I am having my head turned by direct job offers lol
 

Tony Soprano

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So why did you make the jump to S/E at the time? Grass greener and all that?

I think most maint jobs are 12 hours shifts certainly seems that way where I am, but then they are 4on 4off and usually days and nights. Of course you could go into a hospital environment where they seem to work as little as possible but get paid little as well, I believe we have a member who does this? I always wonder what the perks side of hospital work is as wages always seem very low?
S/E is flexible if you can make it pay, unfortunately we are fighting more and more competition these days so prices are being driven down.

It’s all about striking a balance between work and life, it’s no good working all hours each week and having no quality home life. If your partner can work and contribute to the household income then your options open up more as you are not committed to earning big bucks for the family.

Ultimately it’s something that only you and your family can decide, for what works for one doesn’t work for all.
Are you in maintenance then? I thought you were self employed?
 

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I agree with Sidewinder, but would also add DC motors and controllers. As they still used in some industries and are more common than you may have been lead to believe (we use 450ADC motors). Think of AC motors like petrol engines (high torque at high speeds), and DC motors like diesel engines (high torque at very low speeds). Plus, learn about the different analogue signal types used in Industry for control (i.e. 0-20mA, 4-20mA, 0-10V, 0-50VDC, 0-100VDC, 0-200VDC etc. and different encoders using square wave outputs). There a lot more you will need to know to become an industrial electrician. Anyone expecting to be paid £38k, should be well versed in all the aforementioned aspects of industrial electrical theory and practise. And BS7671 still applies such as colour codes of wiring. That why there additional colours listed in table 51 for ELV control circuits, such as orange that has a very particular meaning in industrial control systems.

If you enjoy electrics, rather than it just a means to an end (i.e. to ern money). Then industrial systems far more challenging, but also very rewarding.

Good luck
 
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