Bathroom Extractor Fan

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skittles

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Bought a new extractor fan to replace the old one thatt stopped working

The new fan bought from Wicks has humidistat and timer control! I was hoping to provide a link but wicks do not seem to sell the fan via its web site.

The old fan was wired from a spur in the lighting system and was switched on and off useing pull cords on the fan

Now the wiring instructions for the new fan shows it should be wired via a switch, ceiling or wall.

Two questions,

Firstly am I right I can not put a wall switch inside the bathroom

Secondly I do not get why a switch is required if it is activated and switched off by the pull cord

Anyone HELP! please

 

Mr Sworld

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Bought a new extractor fan to replace the old one that stopped workingThe new fan bought from Wicks has humidistat and timer control! I was hoping to provide a link but wicks do not seem to sell the fan via its web site.

The old fan was wired from a spur in the lighting system and was switched on and off using pull cords on the fan

Now the wiring instructions for the new fan shows it should be wired via a switch, ceiling or wall.

Two questions,

Firstly am I right I can not put a wall switch inside the bathroom

Secondly I do not get why a switch is required if it is activated and switched off by the pull cord

Anyone HELP! please
Hello Skittles. :)

To answer you first question, no, you cannot use a wall switch in a bathroom.

The switch in the instructions may well be a three-pole isolation switch. The reason being that if you need to work on the fan there will be a live and a neutral supply to power the fan and a 'switch live' from the bathroom pull-cord to turn the fan on when the light is turned on.

Is the fan a Wicks model or is it another manufacturer?

 

skittles

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thanks !

looks as if i be wiring a switch

it says its a wicks 156429 model

at 28w it be fine taking power from the light socket

 

Mr Sworld

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The isolator switch must still be outside of the bathroom however.

Also due to zoning in bathrooms mains voltage fans are only allowed in certain areas.

Are you aware of all the regulations concerning electrical work in bathrooms? They are 'special locations' and have some very strict rules about what can and can't be done?

 

skittles

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I think so the fan must be located as so it can not be switched on from the bath/shower

 

Mr Sworld

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As your old fan had a pull-cord that complied with the electrical regs. Your new fan can not use a switch in the bathroom to turn it on and off.

You need to switch it from the bathroom light pull cord or from a switch outside the bathroom.

Have a look at this for more information.

Bathrooms, as I said before, are Special Locations in the electrical regulations and you need to understand these fully.

There are many shock risks in a bathroom from water entering appliances to the fact that your skin has a lower resistance to electricity when it's wet. Please research this more before you just 'swap' the fan as you could introduce a major risk. :(

 
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Bought a new extractor fan to replace the old one thatt stopped workingThe new fan bought from Wicks has humidistat and timer control! I was hoping to provide a link but wicks do not seem to sell the fan via its web site.

The old fan was wired from a spur in the lighting system and was switched on and off useing pull cords on the fan

Now the wiring instructions for the new fan shows it should be wired via a switch, ceiling or wall.

Two questions,
Hello Skittles...

few more points for your consideration.....

was the old fan a mains (230/240v) or a low voltage (12v) ?

Firstly am I right I can not put a wall switch inside the bathroom
How big is the bathroom?

if it is big enough... YES you can!

HOWEVER 90%+ of average bathrooms are NOT big enough to safely locate a wall switch!!!

Secondly I do not get why a switch is required if it is activated and switched off by the pull cord

Anyone HELP! please
ALL appliances should have an accessible point for safe isolation in the event of faults or maintenance work.

portable appliances can be unplugged but items wired directly in to a circuit e.g. light circuit would require a separate isolator switch.

which is why your fan requires a isolator switch as well as the trigger switch from the light cord-pull.

(e.g. you may need to do maintenance work on the fan with the light ON because it is dark or dusk outside??)

I think you will most probably find that the manufactures instructions also recommend a 3amp fused spur is to be included in the supply to the fan?

 
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Hello skittles

as mr s says bathrooms are special locations if you start altering the wiring in the bathroom you will have to install 30mA Rcd protection on circuit to comply with 17th edition wiring regulations. Also comes under part p of building regs.

batty

 
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As your old fan had a pull-cord that complied with the electrical regs. Your new fan can not use a switch in the bathroom to turn it on and off.You need to switch it from the bathroom light pull cord or from a switch outside the bathroom.

Have a look at this for more information.

Bathrooms, as I said before, are Special Locations in the electrical regulations and you need to understand these fully.

There are many shock risks in a bathroom from water entering appliances to the fact that your skin has a lower resistance to electricity when it's wet. Please research this more before you just 'swap' the fan as you could introduce a major risk. :(
Your link is INCORRECT? You can now have sockets AND switches in a bathroom providing they are outside zone 3 which means a pretty big bog. Also must have the respective RCD's fitted :)

 

Mr Sworld

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Your link is INCORRECT? You can now have sockets AND switches in a bathroom providing they are outside zone 3 which means a pretty big bog. Also must have the respective RCD's fitted :)
I know but my logic is that someone who owned a house that is so big you could have a bathroom that large wouldn't be replacing their own fan! :^O So it must be a small bathroom.

 
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I know but my logic is that someone who owned a house that is so big you could have a bathroom that large wouldn't be replacing their own fan! :^O So it must be a small bathroom.
LMAO you are thinking too much ;)

 
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