EICR Question - Consumer Unit and Downlighters

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HTH

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We are planning to let out our 3 story house once we move. It’s a 2001 build and has had no changes to the Electrical fittings / Consumer units. We are planning an EICR and want to prepare in plenty of advance before we move out.

The Consumer Unit (located in the garage under the master bathroom) is a Tenby with Legrand Main Switch, MCB’s for all cats and an MK 7860s Dual Pole RCD covering the MCB’s for the Sockets ccts and a HotTub feed.

Q1. The CU is not metal. Do Metal Consumer Units have to be retrofitted to as build properties from 2001 for Private Rental use ?

Q2. The property also has GU10 Downlighter's as built in many / most rooms of the downstairs rooms. They all have LED’s now, but I don’t think they are Fire Rated Downlighters given the 2001 property age. Will all the Downlighters need replacing with Fire rated Downlights for the EICR to Pass for Private Rental use ?

Picture of Consumer Unit attached.
 

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1. Unless there are signs of thermal damage or loose terminations then it shouldn't need replacing.... however as it looks like you don't have RCD protection on the vast majority of your circuits then I would replace it with a metal consumer unit with RCBO's protecting the circuits

2. The building regulations require that fire compartments are maintained, eg between flats, between a built in garage & dwelling.... a regular house is a single fire compartment so the doownlights should be ok

Bearing in mind that only the person carrying out the EICR can make a proper judgement call as no-one else has seen it
 
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HTH

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1. Unless there are signs of thermal damage or loose terminations then it shouldn't need replacing.... however as it looks like you don't have RCD protection on the vast majority of your circuits then I would replace it with a metal consumer unit with RCBO's protecting the circuits

2. The building regulations require that fire compartments are maintained, eg between flats, between a built in garage & dwelling.... a regular house is a single fire compartment so the doownlights should be ok

Bearing in mind that only the person carrying out the EICR can make a proper judgement call as no-one else has seen it

For the Consumer Unit, all the Sockets and Hot Tub are covered by the RCD.
The non RCD circuits are all Lighting Circuits, Immersion Heaters (2), Smoke Alarms, House Alarm, and Cooker. Do you think any of those should have been covers by the RCD on such a 2001 build ?
Many thanks,
 

Fleeting

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For a start it shouldn't have that MK rcd lashed into it. Probably why the protective devices look pissed. Very odd split for a split load board so it wouldn't surprise me if that has been doctored.
 

Murdoch

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For a start it shouldn't have that MK rcd lashed into it. Probably why the protective devices look pissed. Very odd split for a split load board so it wouldn't surprise me if that has been doctored.

mix and match was only frowned upon recently so you can’t go around handing out C2’s can you?
 

Fleeting

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mix and match was only frowned upon recently so you can’t go around handing out C2’s can you?
Wasn't handing out any Code 2s and it isn't a recent thing I have been quoting it in Periodics for years as it goes against manufactures guidance just because BS7671 now includes it does not make it a new thing.
 

Luckyboy

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I'd say be prepared to fork out for a consumer unit replacement - ideally a full RCBO board, ideally with surge protection.
Downlights should be ok if the wiring checks out and tests are satisfactory.
As others have mentioned, nobody can really tell for sure until you get someone in to physically test all elements of your installation.
 

Mike.J

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Not sure of the regulations in the UK, but non fire rated downlighters in a ceiling with timber floor joists below a room capable of occupation would in my estimation be foolish to say the least, mandatory to be fire rated in the Europe.
 

Sparksfly

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Q1 Metal NO
Also Nothing wrong with fitting another manufacturers rcd if it fits. Keeping with the same if not better quality. (try finding a replacement rcd/mcb that fits years later is near impossible especially at short notice) Manufacturers want you to buy only their stuff, like in other industries ie car etc
Q2. I usually fit fire rated anyhow especially if you want to improve the fire rating of the ceiling then fine.
I second EICR.
 

Fleeting

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Q1 Metal NO
Also Nothing wrong with fitting another manufacturers rcd if it fits. Keeping with the same if not better quality. (try finding a replacement rcd/mcb that fits years later is near impossible especially at short notice) Manufacturers want you to buy only their stuff, like in other industries ie car etc
Q2. I usually fit fire rated anyhow especially if you want to improve the fire rating of the ceiling then fine.
I second EICR.
Your reply to Question 1 is somewhat bizarre.
 

sparky308

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We are planning to let out our 3 story house once we move. It’s a 2001 build and has had no changes to the Electrical fittings / Consumer units. We are planning an EICR and want to prepare in plenty of advance before we move out.

The Consumer Unit (located in the garage under the master bathroom) is a Tenby with Legrand Main Switch, MCB’s for all cats and an MK 7860s Dual Pole RCD covering the MCB’s for the Sockets ccts and a HotTub feed.

Q1. The CU is not metal. Do Metal Consumer Units have to be retrofitted to as build properties from 2001 for Private Rental use ?

Q2. The property also has GU10 Downlighter's as built in many / most rooms of the downstairs rooms. They all have LED’s now, but I don’t think they are Fire Rated Downlighters given the 2001 property age. Will all the Downlighters need replacing with Fire rated Downlights for the EICR to Pass for Private Rental use ?

Picture of Consumer Unit attached.
Q1. There is no requirement to replace the existing plastic consumer unit with a metal one.
Q2. The downlighters are probably fine as the house is usually a single fire compartment.
Can't see any problems with what you have shown - just get a sparky to come and do an EICR then take it from there. The EICR is valid for 5 years so you may as well go ahead with it asap.
 
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Not sure of the regulations in the UK, but non fire rated downlighters in a ceiling with timber floor joists below a room capable of occupation would in my estimation be foolish to say the least, mandatory to be fire rated in the Europe.
you only need fire rated if you are breaking through a fire rated ceiling, which generally, is only an issue in flats. Even non fire rated is good for about half an hour ( JCC used to have a video about that), which if you have working smoke detectors, is long enough to esacape in most properties. As it happens very few downlighters aren't fire rated these days, and the upside is they also stop draughts past the fittings.
 

Fleeting

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To call a downlight "fire rated" is a bit of a misnomer however it puts them into a class of accessories which offer a level of fire protection. A so called "fire rated" downlight will disintegrate like any other fitting when exposed to fire the difference is the intumescent compound contained which expands and fills the hole.
 
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To call a downlight "fire rated" is a bit of a misnomer however it puts them into a class of accessories which offer a level of fire protection. A so called "fire rated" downlight will disintegrate like any other fitting when exposed to fire the difference is the intumescent compound contained which expands and fills the hole.
That's why they are 'rated' and not 'proof'. Fire rated usually means 90 mins, same as fireboard gyproc. Most houses will have burnt down long before that.
 

Fleeting

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But the body of the fitting itself is not fire rated hence my post.
 

Murdoch

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That's why they are 'rated' and not 'proof'. Fire rated usually means 90 mins, same as fireboard gyproc. Most houses will have burnt down long before that.

Quite right.

It always makes me chuckle when sparks say non fire rated lights must be a C2 in a detached home - yet the enormous "hole" being the stairs presents a far bigger danger....

Mis information
 

HTH

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Thanks all for sharing views on coding. I’ll get the EICR done.

One small think I did notice is that there is one blank open slot on the LH side with no blanking cover. I assume that needs to be filled for the EICR ?
I have a pack of MK blanks but they don’t fit. The MK ones are for a thinner CU shell and the clips only accommodate much thinner shell. The Tenby CU being plastic is much thicker than steel. Does anybody know which blanks fit well for thicker plastic CU’s ?
 

Fleeting

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I personally believe that consumer unit has been "doctored" as you should have a half blank space.
 
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