Two ring mains in a room

Talk Electrician Forum

Help Support Talk Electrician Forum:

Humourme

Member
Joined
Oct 29, 2023
Messages
9
Reaction score
5
Location
Scotland
Hi could someone clarify if it is ok to have 2 ring mains in a room if at the board there’s a house layout detailing which socket is on each circuit? The house has been knocked about a bit with some internal stud walls removed hence the conundrum!
Thanks for any input
 

Fleeting

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 27, 2021
Messages
1,430
Reaction score
406
It is fine you can have as many ring final circuits in one room as you want.
 

SPECIAL LOCATION

Trailer Boy - Electrician.
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 28, 2008
Messages
14,179
Reaction score
832
Hi could someone clarify if it is ok to have 2 ring mains in a room if at the board there’s a house layout detailing which socket is on each circuit? The house has been knocked about a bit with some internal stud walls removed hence the conundrum!
Thanks for any input

As has been said there are no electrical dangers by having multiple circuits supplying the same room, in fact it can have advantages such that during a fault you still have some working accessories rather than losing all power to a room!

And, as an additional point often assumed incorrectly, sockets do NOT need to be connected to ring final circuits...

It is perfectly acceptable to use radial circuits to supply sockets, providing appropriate cable sizes and protective devices are used...

As a general rule-of-thumb, it is only normally rooms such as kitchens and/or utility's where more higher power appliances are often connected that ring final circuits tend to be needed in preference over radials..
 

mort2376

The devil's in the details, or the dodgy wiring !
Supporting Member
Joined
Apr 27, 2015
Messages
387
Reaction score
197
Location
Preston, Lancashire
Don't use ring circuits when rewiring now. 20a radials in 2.5 for living/bedrooms and 32a 4mm in kitchens. With appliances on their own radials as required.

Easier to wire and easier to test. I'm surprised the regs haven't got rid of them by now.
 

Andy™

©Resident Geordie™
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2009
Messages
30,397
Reaction score
1,119
Location
S. Tyneside
Don't use ring circuits when rewiring now. 20a radials in 2.5 for living/bedrooms and 32a 4mm in kitchens. With appliances on their own radials as required.

Easier to wire and easier to test. I'm surprised the regs haven't got rid of them by now.

also far easier to extend in future. no having to only go to one point, or extend the ring or whatever, jsut wire to as many sockets as you want
 

binky

retired and loving it!
Supporting Member
Joined
May 7, 2008
Messages
14,298
Reaction score
1,593
Location
Sunny Plymouth
Just from a safety point of view, someone isolating a socket and assuming all others are isolated, and not checking.
Lable the board well! Checking everything with a plug in tester or voltage probes is essential safe working practice. To get to being a retired electrician I learnt a very long time ago to assume nothing 😀
 
Joined
Aug 5, 2014
Messages
8,497
Reaction score
1,221
Location
Woking
For the average DIYer the easiest way to check sockets are isolated is to use a plug in lamp and move it from socket to socket to confirm isolation.

Clearly this isn't really an option with a faulty circuit.
 

SPECIAL LOCATION

Trailer Boy - Electrician.
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 28, 2008
Messages
14,179
Reaction score
832
Just from a safety point of view, someone isolating a socket and assuming all others are isolated, and not checking.

From a safety point of view anyone who assumes anything is isolated without checking first is not competent enough to be working with an invisible substance that can kill a healthy adult in less than a second.

It is about as logical as not looking before you cross a road, because the previous road you crossed had no traffic!

The only assumption you can make from a safety point of view, is that everything is still connected and live until you have proved it to be isolated.

Even if there is just one socket circuit, what if the switch / MCB used for isolating is faulty and has not disconnected the source of power? Or if the MCB labels are incorrect and a 32A cooker & 32A socket ring are swapped? Or the wiring has been crossed between two MCBs? Or borrowed neutral issues..?

Although they may sound unusual.. be assured incorrect label identification, faulty switches can and do happen more often than I would like them too, and I have seen a single ring with each end connected onto different MCBs, and conservatory lights with Live feed from the lighting circuit and neutral tapped into the sockets as they was no neutral at the switch they extended from! etc..

Always test and re-check before touching anything that could be live!!
 

Humourme

Member
Joined
Oct 29, 2023
Messages
9
Reaction score
5
Location
Scotland
It’s based on questions I have asked in the past elsewhere, not necessarily electrical, where there’s normally a torrent of abuse or suggestions that not knowing this means you shouldn’t be doing the job. Good example was asking what size nail I should use to secure counter battens on a roof I was fitting to our new double garage…… I didn’t ask how to fit the trusses, gable ladders, board it out, how to set out the tiles, fit the dry ridge system and dry verge system or how to fit soffits, facias and guttering…… because I knew how to do all that from the drawings and a fantastic Marley site guide. Just wanted to know the correct length of nail for the counter battens as it wasn’t detailed….. the flack was unbelievable. So it was nice to ask a question and get lots of replies with constructive and consistent information. As the header says “ the friendliest forum “ thanks again…… just have to see if I can find a like minded plumbers forum now! 😂
 
Top